Malaria Foundation International Press Box

MALARIA FOUNDATION INTERNATIONAL

Announcements Calendar RBM MIM Networks and Databases More on the Web News About MFI DAM Home

Press Releases





ProMed Mail Post


Tanzania Bans Import Of Chloroquine

Original Article


MALARIA, CHLOROQUINE RESISTANT - TANZANIA
******************************************
A ProMED-mail post


[see also:
1999
----
Malaria, chloroquine resistant - Kenya 19990719144906
Malaria, chloroquine resistant - Kenya (04) 19990726222547
Malaria, drug resistant - Africa: overview 19990320213735]


Date: 6 Jul 2000

From: Marjorie P. Pollack, M.D. Source: Africa News Service, Story Filed 5 Jul 2000 3:05 PM EST [edited]

Tanzania Bans Import Of Chloroquine
------------------------------------
Dar Es Salaam (TOMRIC Agency, 5 Jul 2000) - Tanzania has officially banned import of chloroquine for the treatment of malaria patients following its ineffectiveness.

Announcing the decision yesterday [4 Jul 2000], the deputy Minister for Health, Ms. Tatu Ntimizi told the National Assembly that her ministry has already instructed the Medical Stores Department (MSD) not to import, noting that what is available in shops is only a leftover of what was imported earlier. She said the MSD has already made alternative medicines for malaria treatment, to arrive in the country within 6 months [must be imported medicine]. "The MSD had already awarded a tender for the importation of medicines which will replace chloroquine."

On Monday [3 Jul 2000] the government said it was reviewing its policy on treatment of malaria to make fansidar the first treatment for malaria. The Minister for Health, Aaron Chiduo had earlier said that research on treatment of malaria carried out from 1997 to 1999 revealed that chloroquine was ineffective in curing malaria by 20 to 25 percent. However, Ntimizi said medical record show that depending upon locality, chloroquine had lost the ability to cure malaria in up to 50 percent [of cases] in some areas. Discussion on the effectiveness of chloroquine became hot in April, this year when it was disclosed that malaria would continue killing millions of Tanzanians after its parasites, Plasmodium [falciparum] has now developed a strong resistance against [to] chloroquine which has been a widely used drug in Tanzania. This was based on a research by the Ministry of Health done between 1997 and 1999 which indicated that chloroquine has lost the ability to cure malaria in almost 52 percent [of cases] in various areas in Tanzania also referred as malaria prone regions [Susceptibility is classified as grade I, II and III and it is presumed that it must be grade II or III in 52% of cases. -Mod. EP].

Without disclosing the figure, Ms. Ntimizi said that more patients die of malaria in the country, noting that children and infants were more vulnerable to the disease. The treatment is becoming complicated day after day," she said urging the people to adopt preventive measures. The ministry has recommended the use of other drugs like fansidar, amodiaquine and comaquine [camoquine is the same as amodiaquine]. She said quinine should be used as a last resort.

In its report, WHO recommends sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine [fansidar] as an alternative drug for treatment of malaria in Tanzania. Kenya is one of the countries, which have already replaced chloroquine for the treatment of falciparum malaria. Another country which stopped the use of chloroquine as the first line medication for the disease, owing to resistant strains being prevalent in many areas, is Malawi.

--
ProMED-mail

[The report is important in once again drawing the attention to the increasing problem of drug resistance of P.falciparum malaria in Africa. Fansidar is considerably more expensive than chloroquine, and there are already sporadic reports from East Africa of fansidar resistance. Amodiaquine (camoquine), a chloroquine derivative, was in the eighties thought of as an alternative because it showed higher activity than chloroquine against P.falciparum malaria. However, after introduction to the market in industrialized countries, it was soon found that approximately 1 per 2000 users developed agranulocytosis, and the drug is now not used at all here. -Mod. EP]
............................................ep/ds


*##########################################################*
ProMED-mail makes every effort to verify the reports that are posted, but the accuracy and completeness of the information, and of any statements or opinions based thereon, are not guaranteed. The reader assumes all risks in using information posted or archived by ProMED-mail. ISID and its associated service providers shall not be held responsible for errors or omissions or held liable for any damages incurred as a result of use or reliance upon posted or archived material.
************************************************************
Visit ProMED-mail's web site at . Send all items for posting to: promed@promedmail.org (NOT to an individual moderator). If you do not give your full name and affiliation, it may not be posted. Send commands to subscribe/unsubscribe, get archives, help, etc. to: majordomo@promedmail.org. For assistance from a human being send mail to: owner-promed@promedmail.org.
############################################################
############################################################


Back to Press Releases






Thank you for visiting the MFI Site!


Copyright 1999-2000 R. C. Sponsler;

Malaria Foundation Internatinal

All Rights Reserved.