Outline of discussion

Malaria Research Network: Mechanical Mosquito Control Options: Outline of discussion
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By John Miles on Thursday, March 29, 2001 - 08:38 am:

To discuss how effective existing mechanical controls are, such as nets and
traps.

To discuss and identify how the disease cycle can be further disrupted
mechanically.

To identify environments where mechanical control might be considered
significant.

To discuss if and how combined chemical and mechanical solutions might
improve control.

To discuss comparative costs, ease of use, and environmental impact
between chemical and mechanical control programs.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By John_Miles on Thursday, March 29, 2001 - 03:58 pm:

First of all, can anyone reference or supply data collected on the use of current mechanical solutions such as nets or traps.

Is there any controlled data on the effectiveness of distributing sleeping nets? Are they used properly on an ongoing basis?

Are any controlled trapping programs in effect. What traps are they?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By John_Miles on Thursday, April 12, 2001 - 02:40 am:

The development of mechanical solutions to the spread of Malaria is, I think, an important task. The mosquito is adept at overcoming chemical solutions, with such solutions also affecting the enfironment to various degrees. These people need help. Does anyone have stats on the use of mechanical solutions please. Are you developing mechanical solutions?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By Haile Rajamani on Wednesday, April 25, 2001 - 11:48 am:

John, I agree with you. I too am looking for information on these things. However, what I would like more information on is in novel methods such as the co2 method I have seen advertised on the internet. Also perhaps some kind of say electronic solution. Have people experimented in this area? I am an electronics engineer so forgive my ignorance.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By Cormac Duffy on Wednesday, May 16, 2001 - 07:45 am:

This may not be the correct discussion group for this point but it seems better than the other two (DDT or Pesticides and spraying).

The screwfly was eradicted from USA by breeding screwflies, sterilising them with radiation and then releasing them to breed with wild screwfly who would then lay infertile eggs. Over several generations the screwfly population was thus reduced and eventually eradicated. Obviously sterilised screwfly had to be continually released until the wild fertile ones were eradicated but the project was eventually sucessful.

Could the same policy be adopted to eradicate the mosquito. Yes, but there are problems with this approach. Firstly, the main problem with the screwfly itself was its eggs which when laid in the wound of livestock, eat their way out causing serious injury. By releasing sterilised screwfly not only was the population reduced but also the eggs laid never hatched and so could not cause damage themselves. The system therefore had two advantages.

Merely releasing sterilised mosquitos would reduce and eventually exterminate the insect but initially would exacerbate the malarial and other problems as there would be more not less insects to start with as the sterilised insects were released in addition to the wild population. Whereas sterilised screwfly pose no additional problems since their problems are created by fertile eggs, sterilised mosquitos would cause problems as they could still transmit malaria. So what is the solution?

There have been genetic experiments carried out on fruit flies which have lead to all sorts of mutations including flies with no mouth parts. Now a mosquito with no mouth part cannot transmit malaria and so would not add to any disease problem. But could such an insect, with no mouth part to feed with, live long enough to breed? Perhaps so, as the cranefly would suggest by the fact that the insect part of its lifecycle has no mouth part and its sole purpose is to breed having lived most of its life as a larve underwater.

In summary then, what is required is a series of genetic engineering experiments to develop a species of mosquito with no mouth part. Presuming this moquito could live long enough to breed, they could be breed in captivity, be sterilised with radiation and then released to breed with the wild populations hopefully eradicating the species over a few years.

Any thoughts anyone?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By CDCJR on Saturday, June 02, 2001 - 11:50 am:

I just purchased a Flowtron Mosquito Power Trap via the net; it uses propane which is converted to CO2 & water by way of an electrically charged catalyst to attract mosquitoes, augmented by an Octenol cartridge. It is programmable so it is on 2 hours AM's, 3 PM's (1hr before dawn to 1 hour after dawn, and 1 hour before and 2 hours after dusk.
Alternatively, it can be left on 24/7. I am seeing some mosquitoes in the trap, and still trying to find the best location. I have a fish pond, so I can't use fogging. Does anyone have experience with this device ?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By Sam. Awolola on Tuesday, December 11, 2001 - 05:58 am:

Well I don't subscribe to genetic engineering leading to the development of a mosquito without mouth as was suggested by the last writter. What is needed is an integrated approach and we already have the tools to control malaria. Personal protection with insecticide treated nets, case management and long term residual house spray with rotational insecticides will definetely eliminate malaria not mosquitoes. I believe the impact of malaria is more devastating than the anticipated environmental impact of DDT.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By John Miles on Friday, March 29, 2002 - 10:30 pm:

The control of mosquitoes is achievable by education in three areas. one is in diagnosis and what to do, the next is awareness of personal protection options, and the last is to actively attack the mosquito. This latter point is where mecanical solutions - doing things rather than spraying things - can help to fill the gap being created by ever increasing tolerance of drugs and the gradual reduction in the use of DDT. Tackling man made malaria might well prove the best environment for mechanical solutions. I have some examples here. I would like to know if they are in use:

1 Could irregation gullies be filled with stones sieved from the fields? The water would remain subterranean. If so are sieves handed out?
2 Could ponds be added to urban areas and stocked with fish? Could this dilute the mosquito population by drawing some from surrounding water to breed where the larvae will never survive?
3 Are people educated to maintain the flow of streams so that still pools are minimised.
4 Could livestock be kept nearer habitation to disguise human CO2 emmisions. Is the keeping of animals in the house unwise because they too attract mosquitoes?
5 Can habitats for insect eating birds be created where they might be attracted to breed.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By John Miles on Friday, March 29, 2002 - 10:42 pm:

There are many mosquito traps on the market. In general they are either clever or expensive or both. Are they working? Can I hear from those who are successfully selling a product that traps mosquitoes. And hear from more of those who have bought or distributed them. I would like to use this information to identify which vectors are being attacked and how well. Then to identify to what degree mosquito trapping is something that must be afforded by the individual rather than free issued under organised support.


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